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The activities in this unit require students to understand the importance of Australia’s identity and diversity in both a local and broader context. Moving from the heritage of their local area, students explore the historical features and diversity of their community as represented in symbols and emblems of significance, and celebrations and commemorations, both locally and in other places around the world.

In this unit, students will explore how and why people choose to remember significant events of the past, specifically Anzac Day and the Legend of the ANZACs.

ANZAC or Anzac?

As this is a teaching and learning resource targeted at Year 3 level students, we have deliberately used the capitalised version of ANZAC in parts of this program to reinforce the historical origins of the acronym Australia and New Zealand Army Corp.

 

The following quote can be found within Use of the word ‘Anzac’ Guidelines

There is no rule or law that indicates how the word ‘Anzac’ should be capitalised. For example, DVA only uses ‘ANZAC’ when referencing the ANZAC Corps itself and uses ‘Anzac’ in all other circumstances while the Australian War Memorial (AWM) generally uses ‘ANZAC’ given the AWM’s focus on historical records and memorabilia.

"The empire called and I answered"
Associated Stock and Station Agents Roll of Honour.

Teaching and Learning Sequence:

The activities scaffold the inquiry and personalized learning processes enabling the students to gain evidence by developing questions from provided sources and presenting their understandings of the history of the ANZAC LEGEND of Gallipoli and its significance to their lives today. It is expected that teachers will select and modify these suggestions to meet the needs of their learners, available time and resources.

Pre-unit preparation - is suggested at the beginning of the teaching and learning sequence.

Introducing the topic

Activity 1 - Focus: Gallipoli – What do you know? What are you wondering?

Activity 2 - Focus: What was Australia like in 1910? Why did they volunteer?

Activity 3 - Focus : The journey to Gallipoli

Activity 4 - Focus : Eight months on GALLIPOLI - creating the LEGEND (Including The ANZAC Legend – extension activity)

Activity 5 - Focus: How and why do we honour the Bravery of the ANZACs?

Activity 6 - Focus: Adopting an ANZAC – Links to the local community

Activity 7 - Focus : In search of evidence in the local community - Excursion

Activity 8 - Focus: How do we commemorate ANZAC Day today?

Extension Activity - Community project

SUMMATIVE Assessment task - (including student-led ANZAC Ceremony and Display)

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